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Let's Reload!

by Shari LeGate

You might be thinking to yourself why should I reload?  It's cheaper and easier to just buy ammo, especially when there's a great deal at Walmart or some other big box store. Sure, it's easy to just buy ammunition, but you're missing a big part of the overall shooting experience.

When I started reloading, I learned about the cycle of shooting. Yes, like the cycle of life, there is a cycle to shooting and reloading completes the cycle. I would reload a shell, go out to the range the next day, drop it in my gun, shoot it, watch the target break, keep the empty hall, and then reload it again that evening, starting the cycle all over again. It made me feel I was a part of the entire shooting process. It also gave me great confidence in my ammunition. I knew I loaded that shell and I knew it was good.

I started with a 600 Jr. I loaded on it for a few years, upgraded to a Grabber when I became more proficient and then finally a 9000.

Reloading is easy and it's fun. Getting started is even easier. Right here on the MEC web site are videos that explain the reloading process. And if you want one-on-one instruction, stop by and take one of the free MEC reloading clinics taking place around the country. Here's a listing of locations. The MEC staff is knowledgeable and will spend as much time as necessary for you to feel comfortable.



They’ll also help you pick the right reloader based on the sport you're in, the amount of shooting you do and most importantly, who's doing the reloading. I suggest starting with the 600 Jr. Mark V. It’s the best way to learn the reloading process. From there, once you feel comfortable, you can upgrade to one of the other models.  Just remember, it’s not how fast your reload, but how good the reload is. Quality…. not quantity and with a MEC reloader, you can’t help but get a quality reload and a quality support staff standing behind you to help you along the way. 

Get started and let me know how it goes.  I’d enjoy hearing from you.

Shari


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